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Aggression and Anger

 

  • 7/15
    2014
    36
    13

    10 Ways to Respond to Anger or Aggression

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. Aggressive behaviors may be verbal or physical. They can occur suddenly, with no apparent reason, or result from a frustrating situation. While aggression can be hard to cope with,… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    34
    7

    4 Preventions Tips for Someone with Alzheimer's Aggression

    Try to keep the person calm, secure, and comfortable. Make sure the person is dry (if he or she wears adult sanitary products) and is neither hungry nor thirsty. People with Alzheimer’s forget to eat and can’t always tell you what they need. Keep to basic household routines. Ideally, sleep and meals happen in a… read more

  • 7/8
    2013
    30
    16

    5 Tips for Caregivers Dealing With Aggression and Anger

    If you are at risk for danger, learn techniques to protect yourself and avoid being alone. Do not over-react. Caregivers can calm their loved one by continuing as usual and ignoring the person’s threat. Create a calm environment at home. Be patient and advise a family caregiver. Take a deep breath. read more

  • 8/8
    2013
    52
    1

    5 Tips to Cope with Anger

    Try taking the blame, walking away for a few minutes and then come back and redirect the conversation somewhere else. Change the subject and ask your loved one to help you with something like folding the laundry. Love and respect them like you always have—let them hold onto as much dignity as possible. Sometimes your… read more

  • 7/8
    2013
    30
    2

    8 Tips For Communicating With Your Aggressive or Angry Loved One

    Use an even tone of voice. Validate feelings. Apologize or take blame for the situation. Give simple choices. Be polite rather than bossy. Let your face show genuine concern. If behavior is delusional, go with it. Check your body posture. read more

  • 7/16
    2013
    227
    15

    A Tip to Manage Anger

    Redirection can be useful to manage anger. Arguing with someone with dementia isn’t helpful—it often adds to their frustration and anger. Gently acknowledging that you can see they are angry and taking the blame—although you didn’t do anything wrong—may also help ease the situation. For example, you can say, “Dad, I’m sorry you are so… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    28
    6

    Advice to Handle Combativeness during Showers

    For some, a shower chair and a handheld shower head is very helpful. Make sure the lighting is both sufficient and soothing. Enjoyable music can also help. Protecting the dignity of the person is most important. Make sure they feel respected by the process—make it as calm and enjoyable as possible. Smell the soap; talk… read more

  • 7/15
    2014
    22
    1

    Anger and Aggression Due to Environmental Factors

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. Aggression can be caused by many factors including physical discomfort, environmental factors and poor communication. If the person with Alzheimer's is aggressive, consider what might be contributing to the… read more

  • 7/15
    2014
    7
    2

    Communication That May Cause Anger and Aggression

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.   ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. Aggression can be caused by many factors including physical discomfort, environmental factors and poor communication. If the person with Alzheimer's is aggressive, consider what might be contributing to… read more

  • 7/24
    2013
    17
    9

    Dealing with Combative and Aggressive Behavior

    Most people with dementia are not naturally combative or violet, but the frustration of this disease can cause problems and outbursts. For anger and combativeness, look for triggers (time of day, too much stimulation). Sometimes, taking a break and coming back later helps. Be sure to take care of yourself. read more

  • 7/8
    2013
    17
    1

    Does Everyone With Alzheimer's Eventually Turn Violent?

    Everyone is different, so Alzheimer’s is different in each person. A substantial number of Alzheimer’s patients can exhibit some aggressiveness at some point. It can be alarming to see someone who is normally peaceful become loud and angry all of a sudden. The good news is that, by watching carefully, you can notice what triggers… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    12
    0

    Examples to Starting a Conversation When Your Loved One is Aggressive or Angry

    “I’m here for you, Dad. We will get through this together. The nice, hot shower will be over before you know it.” “Dad, I know you’re frustrated that you can’t remember the date today. This must be hard for you.” “I am sorry that I upset you,” or “I didn’t mean to upset you; I… read more

  • 7/24
    2013
    13
    4

    Fighting Over Personal Belongings

    Never judge the situation or take sides. Try to model great behavior—give them lots of compliments, ask them about favorite topics and have a positive attitude. Simplify the environment if possible. Keep your loved one busy with activity, play lots of music and study their life stories for favorite topics. read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    16
    0

    How to Approach Your Loved One When They are Aggressive or Angry

    Arguing may escalate the situation. Validate feelings and try to gain understanding to you can restore order. Give your loved one what they want as long as it is not dangerous. Apologize and take the blame to help diffuse the situation. Stay calm. Because you had good intentions, you may feel afraid or shocked by… read more

  • 8/5
    2013
    10
    3

    How to Calm An Abusive Dementia Patient

    The caregivers should be trained on the following: The disease itself. How to approach the person prior to speak or interacting. How to reach when there is some belligerence. Try some of the following techniques: Soft music (whatever music they liked when they were younger). Soft lighting. Communication basics—calm and quiet. Reassurance. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    6
    2

    How to Cope With the Physical Aggression of Alzheimer's

    Try to stay calm. Stay safe. Don’t argue. Resist the temptation to punish. Distract. Self-soothe in healthy ways. Ask the doctor about medication. Consider a new living situation. read more

  • 7/9
    2013
    9
    2

    How to Manage Frustrating Alzheimer's Symptoms

    Managing the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease can be quite a challenge. A common symptom of Alzheimer’s suffers is their propensity to say “no”. Changes in the brain found in people with dementia can make it hard for them to understand what they are being asked. Try using some of the tips in this video to… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    7
    0

    Loved One with Alzheimer's is Very Angry, Physically Confrontational and Refuses to Stop Driving

    In a dangerous situation like this, it is recommended you call Adult Protective Services and talk to a social worker there about your rights. They intervene when someone is a danger to themselves or other people and it sounds as if your loved one is both a danger to themselves and to other people. Regarding refusing… read more

  • 7/9
    2013
    18
    2

    Managing Alzheimer's Patient Behavior

    Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias affect the way seniors think and feel and subsequently how they behave. You may see behaviors from your loved ones that are uncharacteristic or even odd. Some common challenging behaviors include refusal, delusions, aggression, false-acquisitions, wandering, agitation and repetition. The behaviors that need to be managed are ones that put… read more

  • 7/9
    2013
    8
    1

    Managing Anger Issues in a Person with Alzheimer's

    First about safety and the law: If a person with dementia is making threats, action can and should be taken if he or she presents a danger to him or herself or others. People suffering from dementia often have personality changes related to the changes occurring in their brains. This can result in their acting… read more

  • 7/23
    2013
    17
    1

    Managing One's Perspective of Reality

    Confusion and anger are common emotions expressed by someone with Alzheimer’s when you try to explain that someone is deceased. Do not argue with them. One suggestion is to simply “go” with the delusion. You may even dial the phone and tell them that the deceased person isn’t home right now. Try talking to them… read more

  • 8/12
    2013
    32
    7

    Overview: Aggression and Anger

    There’s nothing more difficult or unsettling than seeing your loved one become angry or aggressive when you’re trying to help. Aggression is a verbal or physical lashing out toward another person. People with dementia may become angry for a variety of reasons. A person with this disease who becomes angry has many frustrations because of… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    1
    0

    Preventing Your Loved One From Becoming Aggressive or Angry

    Learn what upsets your loved one by involving the whole family if necessary. Create a journal. Look for ways to simplify tasks. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    49
    4

    Quick Suggestions on Handling Sundown Syndrome

    Keeping your loved one active during the day may help reduce sundown syndrome episodes. Close the curtains and turn as many lights on as possible before dusk. It may also alleviate stress on the caregiver to serve dinner before dusk. Keep the environment calm and relaxing, as the goal is to have a smooth, soft… read more

  • 7/24
    2013
    27
    4

    Quick Tip if Your Loved One is Saying Mean Things

    Often the best caregivers become the bad guy. Try your best not to take it personally. Dementia is talking, not your loved one. Don’t let yourself be abused even though you know your loved one is not themselves. This can be a sign that it is time for respite, or a break. read more

  • 7/23
    2013
    31
    5

    Quick Tips to Handle Anger

    Stay calm. Try to figure out what’s triggering the anger—is there something specific? Speak in a calm and reassuring voice. If possible, redirect the person to something else. Give space, about 5 feet, until they calm down. If you feel your safety is threatened, leave the area and come back in a couple of minutes,… read more

  • 7/15
    2014
    6
    0

    Signs of Aggression due to Physical Discomfort

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. Aggression can be caused by many factors including physical discomfort, environmental factors and poor communication. If the person with Alzheimer's is aggressive, consider what might be contributing to the… read more

  • 7/16
    2013
    52
    13

    Take a Trip Down Memory Lane

    When your loved one is engaging in conversation and you notice your loved one is becoming angry, try a redirection technique, perhaps by bringing up a happy memory. Maybe it’s when you and your spouse got married, or the family was together for the holidays. Taking a trip down memory lane together could bring comfort… read more

  • 7/23
    2013
    12
    9

    Taking away Your Loved One's Car/Keys

    You are absolutely right to not let them drive, because that would be dangerous. Because of the Alzheimer’s disease, you aren’t going to be able to get your loved one to understand that they have lost their license and it is dangerous to drive. One thing that may be helpful is to reassure your loved… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    8
    3

    Tips for Managing a Loved One that is Very Aggressive, Angry and Won't Regularly Go to the Bathroom

    You should talk to your loved one’s doctor about the constipation and see if there is a way to prevent this situation rather than have to react to it. This can be very difficult to deal with. As far as his aggressive behavior, you might want to check out the suggestions on helpforalzheimersfamilies.com and see… read more

  • 7/8
    2013
    5
    1

    Tips for Managing a Person with Alzheimer's Who Gets Mad Easily

    When this happens there are some good options. Here are a couple of ideas: First be sure to educate yourself on how to respond to this person in a successful way. A great resource for families, A Dignified Life: The Best Friends Approach to Alzheimer’s Care (HCI, 2012), teaches how to be a “Best Friend”… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    12
    0

    Tips to Control Angry and Aggressive Behavior

    Tell your loved one they’re right, even if they’re not. Don’t be upset; stay calm. Turn on some soothing music or a song you know they love. Listen to their reasons for the anger and ensure them that you understand where they’re coming from. Try to redirect them and let them know they are safe.… read more

  • 7/24
    2013
    9
    3

    Tips to Divert Negativity

    Do your best to get them engaged. Be sure that any in-home workers and use their life story to recall happier times. Check for depression and/or pain. Socialization could be the treatment for dementia, so do what you can to keep your loved one engaged in the community or active. read more

  • 7/16
    2013
    151
    14

    Tips to Handle Anger and Combativeness

    First thing is to step back and protect yourself. Sometimes just leaving for a few minutes and then coming back in can help. Look for triggers. Was the person scared, tired or frustrated? Did we push them too hard to take that shower? If you understand these triggers, you can chance your approach. Sometimes you… read more

  • 8/7
    2013
    54
    2

    Ways to Manage Agitation or Aggression

    Speak softly, move slowly, redirect the conversation if possible. Try singing songs, reading to them or looking at old photos to distract them from what their agitated about. Suggest a car ride to go get a treat. If the weather permits, take a nice stroll around the neighborhood or near by park for some fresh… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    3
    0

    What to Do When Two People with Dementia Upset Each Other in Conversation

    When you notice that the conversation is getting tense, try a redirection technique—perhaps by bringing up a happy memory that both people have in common. Maybe it’s a wedding that both of them attended, or a time when mutual friends and family were together for the holidays. Taking a trip down memory lane together could… read more

  • 7/23
    2013
    10
    0

    What to do When Your Loved One Feels Controlled

    People with dementia get suspicious when they are losing their memory. They think they are being left out of things or that family members are talking about them. Here are a few tips: Try not to prove your loved one wrong—it just adds to the problem. Sometimes it’s best to take blame and change the… read more

  • 8/2
    2013
    9
    2

    What to Know About Rude Public Displays in Early Dementia

    Families of people recently diagnosed with dementia often complain or worry about personality changes they’ve begun to notice. One common variation: Someone who’s always been polite, controlled, and socially appropriate begins to say and do uncharacteristic things in public. What this can look like: Being rude or short-tempered with guests, hosts, store clerks, and restaurant… read more

  • 7/8
    2013
    13
    2

    Why is My Loved One Always Angry With Me?

    When you’re facing a loved one who’s unexpectedly angry, try following these steps: Take a break. Sometimes just pausing and coming back in 5 or 10 minutes works. Try saying, “Mom, I’m so sorry I misunderstood what you wanted for breakfast. I’ll be back in a few minutes to check in with you.” Look for… read more

  • 7/23
    2013
    7
    1

    Your Loved One and Their Independence

    Make your loved one feel that you are on their team. Work together to help maintain independence and figure out a plan together how you can do that. If your loved one’s dementia has progressed to the point that they are unable to understand, then the less said may be the best route. read more

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