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Overview: Aggression and Anger

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Posted August 12, 2013

 

There’s nothing more difficult or unsettling than seeing your loved one become angry or aggressive when you’re trying to help. Aggression is a verbal or physical lashing out toward another person. People with dementia may become angry for a variety of reasons. A person with this disease who becomes angry has many frustrations because of things that were once easy he can no longer do. Because you loved one’s brain isn’t functioning normally, the one way they can communicate their wishes is through aggression. The clear message from your loved one is: “Stop what you are doing!” For example, if you start to undress them in preparation for a bath or to clean them—they don’t understand your intent, or have a fear of bathing, they are going to try to stop you with words and sometimes with actions. Your approach is important in restoring calm. So are certain strategies and technique. You may feel afraid, threatened or shocked by the aggression, but you can gain confidence and success with changes to your approach.

Source: Confidence to Care

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