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Agitation and Anxiety

 

  • 7/8
    2013
    44
    5

    6 Ways to Communicate When Your Loved One is Agitated

    Be reassuring. Be flexible. Slow down and make eye contact. Take slow, deep breaths. If your loved one is pacing, go with him/her. If your loved one is sitting, but fidgety, sit down beside them or kneel down. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    5
    1

    Advice to Reduce Teeth Grinding

    Play their favorite music. Try a low dose of medication such as Xanex or Ativan. Try chewing gum. Try red wine. read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    59
    1

    How to Approach Your Loved One When They are Agitated or Anxiety Ridden

    Try de-cluttering the environment. Learn trigger points and avoid them in the future. Create a calm space. Be aware of what is in your loved one’s line of vision. Make sure your loved one has enough light. Low lighting could trigger agitation and anxiety. Create a change of scenery. Try a gentle touch. Your loving… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    7
    1

    How to Help Loved One Cope with Moving In to My Home

    When you move your loved into your home, you might want to consider making his or her bedroom look and feel very similar to their current bedroom. Also, does your loved one have some objects he or she really loves and would be comforted by in your home? In that way, when your loved one… read more

  • 7/29
    2013
    25
    1

    How to Help your Loved One with Agitation

    See if you can identify triggers other than time. If you can find a trigger, eliminate it. Amp up activity during the day to encourage fatigue at night. Waken the person relatively early in the day. When agitation begins, offer a soothing snack. If dinner is served late, make sure the person has a snack… read more

  • 7/8
    2013
    16
    1

    How to Prevent Your Loved One's Agitation and Anxiety

    Set up personalized routines and maintain structure by keeping the same general routines. Reduce caffeine intake, sugar, and junk food. Learn your loved one’s triggers. When visiting, watch for signs in body language and facial experiences. Be sensitive to your loved ones most alert and most tired times of the day. Eliminate what’s confusing or… read more

  • 7/15
    2014
    28
    2

    How to Respond to Agitation and Anxiety

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.   ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. A person with Alzheimer's may feel anxious or agitated. He or she may become restless, causing a need to move around or pace, or become upset in certain… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    24
    1

    How to Speak With Your Loved One When They Experience Agitation or Anxiety

    “We’ll get to the doctor’s appointment in time, Mom. How about a cup of tea first?” “I can see you’re concerned about the pile of papers and I am too. Let me clean that up.” “I know you’re missing your mother. Tell me your favorite story about her.” “President Eisenhower was a great man. What… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    8
    3

    Loved One with Alzheimer's is Very Agitated When I Leave the Room

    Is it possible to get your loved one involved in something that distracts them—a television show, or anything that can hold their attention for a few minutes? Also, as difficult as this may be, if your leaving the room is too upsetting for him or her, you might want to consider if there is a… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    11
    0

    Loved One with Dementia Refuses to Go to Adult Day Center and Forgets People

    If this is just a typical adult day center, perhaps consider if there is an adult day program for people with dementia or one for people without cognitive issues. If it is for people with cognitive issues, they are likely used to this problem of refusing to come to the program and may be able… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    2
    0

    Managing Agitation During the Holidays

    Holidays can be a confusing time for people. One idea to help calm a person with Alzheimer’s during the holidays is to focus on traditions that they may remember from their past. Another idea is to really consider what activities the person is involved in. Large groups might be too much for that person. Ask… read more

  • 8/12
    2013
    12
    6

    Overview: Agitation and Anxiety

    Your loved one’s agitation and anxiety can upset the entire family. Anxiety is experiencing worry, uneasiness or nervousness, while agitation is the physical result of that anxiety. You loved one may be restless, fidgety, unable to sleep well, unable to concentrate on tasks and may pace (walk to the point of exhaustion). Some triggers could… read more

  • 7/15
    2014
    16
    0

    Possible Causes of Agitation for Someone with Alzheimer's

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. Anxiety and agitation may be caused by a number of different medical conditions, medication interactions or by any circumstances that worsen the person's ability to think. Ultimately, the person… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    3
    1

    Preventing Your Loved One From Anxiety and Agitation

    Work as a family to come up with solutions. Keep a food diary. Plan ahead and don’t over-schedule. Observe patterns in your loved one’s behavior. read more

  • 11/26
    2013
    23
    7

    Reassure Your Love

    Just keep reassuring how much you love them and that you will be with them along this long journey one day at a time. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    17
    1

    Suggestions to Keep Patient Calm When Agitated Even If They Are Medicated

    Staying calm yourself is one of the most important things you can do. The more agitated you become, the more likely the person with dementia will also become agitated. Try using a distractor that gives them pleasure—a TV show that calms them down, a food they enjoy, or a walk looking at a garden. Sometimes… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    7
    2

    Tips on How to Cope with Time Confusion

    Reality orientation. Writing what time you went out on a card might help if your loved one can compare to their watch time. Reassurance. Distraction. Flexibility when their anxiety escalates is crucial. Schedule appointments and events at times when the person is less anxious. Consult with physician for an anti-anxiety drug that might take the… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    15
    5

    Tips to Deal with Teeth Grinding

    Talk to your local dentist about a guard to help manage the grinding. A baby teething ring may help, too. Give them a clean wash cloth to chew on. Ask the doctor to check their sugar. Sometimes if they have high sugar levels at night, the teeth grinding is worse. If your loved one is… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    21
    7

    Tips to Handle Agitated Behavior During the Holidays

    Focus on traditions that they may remember from their past. Consider what activities the person is involved in. Large groups might be too much for that person. Ask that person to share stories of their favorite Christmas or other holiday traditions. read more

  • 7/15
    2014
    10
    2

    Tips to Prevent Agitation in Someone with Alzheimer's

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. A person with Alzheimer's may feel anxious or agitated. He or she may become restless, causing a need to move around or pace, or become upset in certain places… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    31
    0

    When Your Loved One Can't Find Words

    Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease can rob people of speech. For example, a loved one with Alzheimer’s might have trouble finding words to express himself, or will find herself unable to finish sentences. This can be a frustrating experience. When this happens, you might be able to “carry” the conversation simply by helping to fill in the… read more

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