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Care Options

 

  • 7/9
    2013
    13
    0

    5 Key Steps to Alzheimer’s End-of-Life Planning

    End of life planning for individuals with Alzheimer’s or other dementias involves many important discussions and key steps that you should begin to consider as soon as your loved one receives the diagnosis. While it may seem more natural to take it one day at a time and avoid thinking about the inevitable challenges that… read more

  • 7/10
    2014
    1
    1

    5 Tips on Dementia and Care Options

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world's leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. Research all care options before deciding which is a good fit. Ask providers if they have training in dementia care. Familiarize providers with the needs and likes of the… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    5
    1

    Advice for Moving a Loved one Closer from Far Away

    Persons with dementia respond well to begin with a caring family member. Many families share the responsibilities of taking acre of a loved one who does travel between houses. A long trip may be stressful—be sure that their medical benefits travel with them. Change can be hard for any person with dementia, but if you… read more

  • 4/30
    2014
    40
    1

    Advice on Moving Loved One to an Assisted Living Facility

    I just wanted to share a short piece of advice. My mother- just turned 86- always extremely strong willed and difficult and now in midstage Alzheimer's was struggling in her own home for the last few years. It was a constant source of stress for me as I live an hr away. I spent a… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    6
    0

    Big-Picture Signs it Might be Time for Assisted Living

    Keep the big red flags in mind. Certain situations make it more obvious that it’s wise to start thinking about alternate living arrangements. Look for: Recent accidents or close calls. Did your loved one take a fall, have a medical scare, or get in a fender bender (or worse)? Who responded and how long did… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    3
    1

    Bringing Loved One Back Home from a Living Facility

    If your loved one is demonstrating positive behavior at the living facility, take your loved one out and about and possibly home. If it doesn’t work, you’ll know not to try it again for awhile. If it does, you can enjoy that special time in their home. You might also try a field trip to… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    1
    0

    Encouraging Positive Thoughts about Living Facilities

    Wait a few weeks and simply try again. Sometimes as the persons with dementia gets worse, they are actually more open to doing things they previously didn’t want to do. Regroup with the staff. Make sure they know your loved one’s favorite things and preferences. If they come out with a warm greeting, your loved… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    6
    0

    End of Life Care and Planning

    Your loved one may be a candidate for hospice services, and you and the whole family could benefit from those holistic and supportive approaches. You should review with your family his/her end of life wishes and discuss what you do and don’t want at this point (and what your loved one would want/not want). These… read more

  • 7/16
    2013
    17
    5

    False Accusations about Assisted Living Facility

    Persons with dementia often have hallucinations, become suspicious, and have paranoia. So, some tips for handling this: Validate their feelings about the situation and then as naturally as possible change the subject to something more pleasant, or change what you are doing—for example, get up and take a walk with them. If your loved one… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    7
    2

    Family Conflict about Loved Ones End of Life Care

    Work with Hospice, gently advocate for your loved one, and spend time engaging them one-on-one the best you can through touch, music, and even getting them outside on a sunny day for some fresh air and vitamin D. Families often pull apart over these issues. If possible, recognize that your family member is likely doing… read more

  • 8/20
    2013
    5
    4

    Healthcare Decision Helper for Seriously Ill: Five Wishes

    The Five Wishes document (PDF) helps you express how you want to be treated if you are seriously ill and unable to speak for yourself. It is unique among all other living will and health agent forms because it looks to all of a person’s needs: medical, personal, emotional and spiritual. Five Wishes also encourages… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    4
    4

    Ideas to Help Provide Alzheimer's Care From Far Away

    Lend a supportive ear. Connect with the patient. Don’t leave all the medical know-how to others. Provide help financial help. Stay in the loop. Join a local Alzheimer’s group. Be technology savvy. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    1
    0

    Key Things to Look For in an Assisted Living Facility

    If you go to the assisted living facilities association website, ALFA.org, there is a checklist that you can use to assess assisted living facilities. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    3
    0

    Kitchen Signs it Might be Time for Assisted Living

    Go through the kitchen, from fridge to cupboards to oven. Because people spend so much time in this room, you can learn a lot. Look for: Stale or expired foods. We all buy more than we need. Look for signs that food is not only old but that this is unnoticed—mold, sour milk that’s still… read more

  • 7/9
    2013
    3
    1

    Long-term Alzheimer's Care Options

    Whether you’re at that crossroads right now or just planning ahead, consider the following long-term care options for your loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. Options for Remaining at Home Non-medical in-home care. In-home care allows your loved one to remain in the comfort of familiar surroundings—which is especially important to someone experiencing… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    4
    0

    Money Signs it Might be Time for Assisted Living

    Rifle through the mail. Your loved one’s mail can offer an often-overlooked clue to how he or she is managing money, a common early warning sign of cognitive trouble. Look for: Snowdrifts of mail in various places. Finding lots of mail scattered around raises concern about how bills, insurance, and other matters are being managed… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    8
    0

    Moving Loved One to an Unfamiliar Area

    A change for someone with dementia may be hard at first, but they will probably adapt just fine. It is not recommended to make a move if a person has a rich social network in their home town or wonderful services. If the move is to be nearer to family members, that will be beneficial.… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    9
    1

    Moving your Loved One to an Assisted Living Facility

    The two major reasons for moving to an assisted living facility are safety and socialization. Even knowing you need to make the placement doesn’t always make it easy. Most excellent programs know how to welcome people like your loved one, create an interesting and meaningful day, help them feel valued and part of the community,… read more

  • 8/20
    2013
    4
    2

    Overview: Care Options

    When caring for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease it is important to consider and research both short and long term care options.  As the condition progresses, adapting your care plan based on the severity of symptoms and behaviors may be necessary. When feasible, some care for their loved ones at home and use respite… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    22
    2

    Rest of Family Won't Assist in Caring for Loved One with Alzheimer's

    It may be useful to share with your family all that you are doing in being the primary caregiver for your loved one and ask them for ways they might be able to help you with the work load. Family members sometimes don’t help because a) they think the caregiver has it all under control… read more

  • 7/10
    2014
    1
    0

    Signs of Abuse in Someone with Alzheimer's

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. Bruises, pressure marks, broken bones, abrasions and burns may be an indication of physical abuse, neglect or mistreatment. Unexplained withdrawal from normal activities, a sudden change in alertness or… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    4
    1

    Social Signs it Might be Time for Assisted Living

    Think realistically about the person’s social connections. Social circles tend to shrink with age, which can have health and safety implications. Look for: Signs of active friendships. Does your loved one still get together for lunches or outings with friends or visits with neighbors, or participate in religious activities or other group events? Does he… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    3
    1

    Suggestions for End of Life Planning

    When your loved one is in the later stages of Alzheimer’s, it can be hard to predict longevity. Begin to discuss end-of-life options—do you want to treat every illness or infection, or focus on comfort care? What would your loved one want (and did they express their wishes in an advance directive)? Hospice can be… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    2
    0

    Telling Your Loved One About Their Move

    When dementia is in the picture, local reasoning fails. It will be hard to convince your loved one to make the change. Get the new place fixed up with some of your furniture and just make the move. Let your loved one know shortly before that you’ve arranged a lovely place to live and drive… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    3
    1

    The Benefits of Adult Daycare for Someone with Alzheimer's

    For elderly people with Alzheimer’s, adult daycare offers: A chance to get out of the house. A break from being with the caregiver. Interactions with other people. Stimulating activities. Other therapies as needed (such as physical therapy or speech therapy). Possibly a delay in cognitive decline in the early stages. Prolonged independent living. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    4
    1

    Up-Close Signs it Might be Time for Assisted Living

    Give your loved one a big hug. Clues aren’t always visible from a distance; especially when you don’t see the person every day, you might learn more through touch. Look for: Noticeable weight loss. Does the person feel thinner? Are clothes loose, or has he added notches to his belt? Seeming more frail. Do you… read more

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