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Confusion and Memory Loss

 

  • 8/6
    2013
    72
    5

    5 Ways to Handle the Request to Talk to a Deceased Person

    Always agree when possible. Trying to correct or inform your loved one creates agitation. Tell your loved one the person is either resting, gone to the store, will be back in a little while, etc. Meet your loved one in their reality. If they wake up and think they are 30 years old again and… read more

  • 7/24
    2013
    7
    6

    Advice on Handling Delusions

    Gently provide reassurance. Ask your loved one to tell you more about the delusion—sometimes just letting them talk it out can help. Let your loved one know that you are concerned and empathetic and that you will always be there for her. read more

  • 7/16
    2013
    52
    5

    Advice on Helping Your Loved One When They're Confused

    It is common to want to be sensitive when your loved one is doing something not quite right, but it is always beneficial to tell them. Do it with some kindness. For example, don’t say, “Mother, you are doing this all wrong—do it this way!” Instead, try, “Mom, let me give you a hand. What… read more

  • 7/16
    2013
    23
    14

    Alleviating Delusions and Hallucinations

    Here are some things you can try to alleviate the behaviors: Make sure your loved one has adequate lighting available. Be extra diligent about getting proper nutrition in your loved one’s diet. Keep your loved one’s routine consistent, as well as their environment. read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    21
    0

    Communication When Your Family Member is Confused

    If Mom says, “I’m waiting for Dad to pick me up,” and Dad is deceased, say: “Tell me again about how you and Dad first met.” If Dad says, “We just sold the car last week, but it’s been five years,” say: “I hope the new owner still loves the car as much as we… read more

  • 7/24
    2013
    26
    4

    Coping as a Caregiver

    The simple message is ask friends and family to give you some help. Consider a support group or local Alzheimer’s Association workshop. Knowing more helps. Also, so important is to practice good self care. Time out of doors, walking and exercising along with the occasional ice-cream cone can help. read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    5
    3

    Dealing with Delusions and Hallucinations

    Sometimes different combinations of medications can be the cause of hallucinations, so it’s probably worth a conversation with your loved one’s doctor to determine whether a prescription adjustment might help. You may also be able to use memories from your loved one’s past that you are familiar with to redirect some of their questions, or… read more

  • 7/23
    2013
    11
    8

    Fixation on Particular Things

    First, try to redirect your loved one to a different topic. If that doesn’t work, try to find why they might be fixated on a certain topic. If it’s clothes, maybe they liked to shop in the past. If it’s food, maybe they enjoyed cooking. read more

  • 7/9
    2013
    12
    6

    Guidance for Caregivers Managing Confusion

    If your loved one is confused, you will likely need plenty of help from family and friends. Remember that a respite does not need to be an expensive vacation. Exercise as often as possible. Trust in God for strength. read more

  • 7/17
    2013
    31
    1

    Handling False Accusations

    It can be very distressing to be accused of things you aren’t doing. The best thing you can do is not to argue with your loved one or try to get them to see the reality of the situation. They aren’t able to understand. If they are accusing you of stealing the same objects over… read more

  • 7/9
    2013
    11
    2

    How to Communicate When Your Loved One is Confused

    Limit input. Learn to be a patient, good, and creative listener. Use visual cues to reinforce. Demonstrate and simplify. Do with them, not for them. Try three times—three different ways to help your loved one understand. read more

  • 7/15
    2014
    9
    0

    How to Respond to Confusion

    The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer's Association, reused with permission. In the later stages of the disease, a person with Alzheimer's may not remember familiar people, places or things. Situations involving memory loss and confusion are extremely difficult for… read more

  • 7/12
    2013
    5
    0

    How to Use Your Loved One's Memories to Provide Comfort in the Present

    People with dementia can not store new memories effectively, therefore using memories from the past can help to make sense of the present. Watch this video to see some ways to help manage a positive environment when your loved one needs comfort. read more

  • 7/17
    2013
    10
    1

    Loved One is Recently Diagnosed and Embarrassed

    You may want to consider having an open relationship with your loved one. You can share with them that you have noticed they get embarrassed when they forget things, and they aren’t as open to doing the things you used to do together. They might be appreciative if you ask them the best way you… read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    7
    0

    Loved One with Alzheimer's Doesn't Realize Who I Am and Asks Me for "Myself"

    There is a lot of debate about “therapeutic fibbing”—the idea of choosing not to tell someone with dementia the truth as a way to handle a situation that is causing them to be upset. It is best to try another technique first, and then to use therapeutic fibbing if other things fail. So, in this… read more

  • 8/8
    2013
    2
    0

    More Tips for Handling a Request to Speak to Someone Who's Deceased

    First and foremost, don’t try to change their mind or correct them. Their reality is much different then ours. Redirect the conversation or use some interventions to direct their mind somewhere else. When your loved one asks for someone who is no longer alive, explain they are at work, went to the store or out… read more

  • 8/12
    2013
    23
    1

    Overview: Confusion and Memory Loss

    Confusion is one of the primary symptoms of dementia. Those with dementia confuse past and present, and cannot always reason things out. Memory loss is what initiates the confusion. While you can’t fix it, you can do important things to help your family member work around some of these problems. It is important that everyone… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    6
    0

    Tactics for When Your Loved One is Confused

    Avoid arguing with your loved one—just go with it and reassure them that they are cared for. Be more descriptive in your explanations. Speak simply with short sentences. Learn to be a creative listener. Confusion may cause your love one to misidentify certain articles. Break down daily tasks into simple steps. Use the “your hand… read more

  • 7/23
    2013
    4
    1

    Telling a Loved One that a Family Member is Deceased

    Gauge your loved one’s memory. If your loved one does not remember what you share about the family member from day to day, you may be able to use a memory or a story about the family member to explain their absence in away that satisfies their curiosity, but doesn’t upset them. Try to understand… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    6
    4

    Tips to Avoid Memory Loss and Confusion

    Pause and think about the impact of dementia in your loved one’s life. Consider your home layout. Maintain an organized home free of clutter. Keep a journal. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    6
    0

    Tips to Handle Company during the Holidays

    One thing to consider is limiting the amount of time your loved one spends with people and also keeping the number of people they are with at one time to a minimum. Consider giving them a place they can go to get away from all of the commotion and relax. It can be very overstimulating… read more

  • 7/23
    2013
    0
    2

    Tips to Manage Your Loved One’s Confusion

    Plan an activity with your family member. Keep a journal. read more

  • 8/2
    2013
    12
    0

    Trash Can Confusion in People With Dementia

    Strange as it sounds, sometimes people with dementia forget the purpose of a trash can. This can result in three different, vexing behaviors. Here’s how to cope. Rummaging. Your loved one may rummage through the trash routinely, especially if prone to rummaging behavior generally (going through a desk, a drawer, or papers, for example). The… read more

  • 7/15
    2013
    7
    0

    What to Do When a Loved One with Alzheimer's Forgets that Someone is Dead

    Sometimes, a person suffering from dementia forgets that a spouse or other loved one has died. They may ask where the person is, or insist that they want to visit them. For the person with dementia, being told that this person is dead can be like hearing it for the first time, along with all… read more

  • 7/24
    2013
    7
    0

    When a Memory of an Event is just Wrong!

    It’s hard to win an argument with a person with dementia. It’s okay to gently cue but it doesn’t help to argue or correct. If your loved one says President Eisenhower is doing a great job, say “I like Ike too.” It’s important to go with their reality and flow. read more

  • 8/6
    2013
    25
    5

    When Someone With Dementia Says, "I Want to Go Home"

    Don’t argue, “But you are home!” For one thing, the “home” being spoken of may not be the same place you’re thinking of. Hear “home” as a feeling you need to read. When people with mid- or late-stage dementia who live in a facility or are hospitalized say, “I want to go home,” what they’re… read more

  • 7/17
    2013
    11
    1

    When Your Loved One Doesn't Recognize You

    When someone is at a stage where they are no longer recognizing people, even if they recognize some people but not others, it can be helpful for everyone to say their name and who they are. So, for example, you can assume they may not remember you and simply walk in and say, “Hi, Mom,… read more

  • 7/16
    2013
    29
    2

    When Your Loved One Doesn't Remember Where They Are

    As your loved one enters this stage of Alzheimer’s, it is difficult to adapt to answering questions like, “Where am I?” Explain patiently to them where they are, and make sure they know they are safe and in a place of love. At home, consider keeping some trinkets or physical objects that you know they… read more

  • 7/17
    2013
    13
    1

    When Your Loved One Thinks You're Someone Else

    You can chat with your loved one about the person they are mistaking you for, or ask about something related to them. The important thing is to not try to get her to understand or to make her wrong. For example, if they call you by their brother’s name and you are her husband, you… read more

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