Call 888-734-8645 today for Home Instead Senior Care dementia care services in your area.

How to Read Emotional Responses in Someone With Severe Dementia

4
1
Posted August 6, 2013

 

Sadness, joy, appreciation, fear—emotions of many colors still register with your loved one. The difference: it’s difficult now to express them. Just knowing that your loved one still experiences emotions can help make your time together more meaningful and help you improve his or her quality of life.

Watch closely, and you’ll learn the patterns that are unique to your loved one. For example:

  • Are your loved one’s eyes open wide or shut? Are they tracking you or looking away? Tearing up?

  • Are the teeth clenched, or is the mouth relaxed?

  • What’s the nature of the sounds that are made during certain experiences? A distressed moan may come to sound different from a pleased one.

Many caregivers say they can see whole messages—“Thank you,” “I love you”—written on the face, even if no longer uttered aloud.

Source: Caring.com

Was this article helpful?

 

We make an effort to answer all questions, but cannot guarantee your question will be selected for reply. Read how we protect your information

 

Receive helpful Alzheimer’s tips, resources and articles by email from Home Instead Senior Care?

 

By submitting this question, you agree to the Terms of Use for this site.

Give a useful piece of advice, or share a story that may lend emotional support.

We make an effort to answer all appropriate questions, but cannot guarantee your question will be selected for reply.

Your name display option (required):

 

Receive helpful Alzheimer’s tips, resources and articles by email from Home Instead Senior Care?

 

By submitting this question, you agree to the Terms of Use for this site.

Get On-the-Go Dementia Advice
Rocket Fuel