The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer’s Association, reused with permission.

  • Bruises, pressure marks, broken bones, abrasions and burns may be an indication of physical abuse, neglect or mistreatment.
  • Unexplained withdrawal from normal activities, a sudden change in alertness or unexpected depression may be an indicator of emotional abuse.
  • Bruises around the breasts or genital area may be a sign of sexual abuse.
  • Sudden changes in financial situations may be the result of exploitation.
  • Bedsores, unattended medical needs, poor hygiene and unusual weight loss may indicate neglect.
  • Belittling, threats or other uses of power by spouses, family members or others may indicate verbal or emotional abuse.
  • Strained or tense relationships and frequent arguments between the caregiver and person with disease may be a sign of abuse. Abuse may originate from either a caregiver or a person with dementia. A person with dementia may exhibit more aggressive behaviors as the disease progresses and cognitive function and ability to reason decline. No one should live in threat of harm or danger to themselves or others.

Reporting Abuse

To report an incident or concern of abuse or neglect, call the Alzheimer’s Association (800.272.3900) or Eldercare Locator (800.677.1116). You’ll be connected to your state or local adult protective services division or to a long-term care ombudsman. You do not need to prove that abuse is occurring – it is up to the professionals to investigate suspicions.

Link: http://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-dementia-elder-abuse.asp#signs