Diagnosing Depression with Alzheimer’s Disease

The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer’s Association, reused with permission. There is no single test or questionnaire to detect depression. For a person to be diagnosed with depression in Alzheimer’s, he or she must… Read More

Symptoms of Depression with Alzheimer’s Disease

The following tips are provided by the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research.  ©2013 Alzheimer’s Association, reused with permission. Identifying depression in someone with Alzheimer’s can be difficult, since dementia can cause some of the same symptoms. Examples of symptoms common to both… Read More

Overview: Mood Changes

Throughout the progression of dementia, mood changes may occur and sometimes can be a complete surprise. Your family member may experience difficult mental, emotional and even physical challenges that cause these increasing mood changes. When a person can’t remember or is constantly confused they may be frustrated, fearful and even… Read More

How to Read Emotional Responses in Someone With Severe Dementia

Sadness, joy, appreciation, fear—emotions of many colors still register with your loved one. The difference: it’s difficult now to express them. Just knowing that your loved one still experiences emotions can help make your time together more meaningful and help you improve his or her quality of life. Watch closely,… Read More

How to Calm Someone with Alzheimer’s When They’re Crying

Constant crying is very often a sign of depression, which affects people with Alzheimer’s at a higher than average rate. Ask your loved one’s physician to evaluate them for depression. Speak to the action directly. For example: “You seem sad. Could you tell me what you are sad about?” Reassure… Read More

5 Ideas for Coping With Early Dementia Mood Loss

First, know that these mood changes are the direct result of the disease process (rather than just an emotional reaction to having the disease). Try hard not to take apathy personally. You may bear the brunt of a blunted mood, but the reaction isn’t to you any more than to… Read More

What to Do If Your Loved One is Moodier Than Normal

Don’t take mood swings personally—even though they seem directed at you. The root cause is what is happening in the brain rather than something you’ve done. Be as supportive as possible and don’t pick fights. Help the person compensate for memory loss by sticking to routines, leaving notes, repeating yourself,… Read More

Quick Tip to Improve the Temperament of an Alzheimer’s Patient

Sunshine can improve the temperament of an Alzheimer’s patient. Poor lighting can add to confusion and create behavioral problems like paranoia. Sunlight gives you natural Vitamin D. Let the sun shine in. Read More

Preventing Mood Swings

Be mindful of your loved one’s schedule and adapt if necessary. Moods can be difficult to predict, so keep a journal of what is causing these changes and triggers. Talk to the doctor about your loved one’s mood changes. Read More

Starting the Conversation When Your Loved One Struggles with Mood Changes

“I’m excited about the family reunion tomorrow, Mom,” instead of “The family reunion starts tomorrow, Mom, we need to pick out your dress, do your nails and get your hair done.” “Would you like oatmeal or cream of wheat today for breakfast?” “Mom, I’m sorry I rushed you during your… Read More