• Offer liquids throughout the day; don’t wait for the person to ask.

  • Don’t just hand over a glass; stand by and make sure the drink is actually sipped.

  • Vary the types of beverages offered: water, juice, milk, hot chocolate, cider. Even coffee, tea, and soda are okay in moderation (about a cup a day) if the person prefers them.

  • Do, however, curb caffeinated beverages if fear of getting to the bathroom on time is an issue, as caffeinated drinks can cause frequent urination.

  • Issue mild reminders during the meal: “Have a sip of water…try the iced tea”.

  • Leave athletic water bottles around the house or carry them around during the day.

  • Serve fruit, which contains a lot of water, especially watermelon, melon, and citrus.

  • Be sure you know the symptoms of dehydration: increased confusion or lethargy, complaints of headache, dry skin or mouth, feeling warm to the touch.

  • Know that diarrhea and vomiting increase the risk of dehydration, so monitor the person especially closely when he’s ill, and notify the doctor if you suspect dehydration.